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Fueled Your Brain With Better Digestion

Can digestion Make a Difference in your mental sharpness?


Digestion and the production of digestive enzymes are necessary to break down foods and to have them absorbed correctly in the gastrointestinal tract. People with poor digestion will have problems absorbing crucial nutrients like vitamin b-12 and omega-3 fatty acids, necessary for optimal brain function.





What if you have bad digestion? Can digestive enzymes help your digestion and help your brain? Absolutely!


Can digestive enzymes help children with a challenging disease that affects the brain like autism? Children with autism have challenging symptoms like lack of concentration, focus, aggression, hyperactivity, etc. Also, the vast majority have gastrointestinal issues.


Researchers did a clinical trial on 101 children with autism and gave them digestive enzymes for three months (1). The surprise here is that the kids not only improve from gastrointestinal problems but, more importantly, symptoms of autism like abnormal behavior, emotional issues, and general symptoms.


Wow! What is the takeaway here? Improve digestion, and the brain will be sharper.


Be persistent with your efforts to improve your health, and you will be shocked by your results.


Have a great start to the week,


David Rivas


P.S. By the way, If you are interested in improving your brain health or you are affected by autism, I wrote the book Resilient Brain that will show up how to sharpen your mind or overcome difficult symptoms of autism with nutrition. Here is the link: www.nuterel.com


Disclaimer: This information is for educational purposes only. Always consult with your primary care physician before starting any supplements. For more details, you can go to www.nuterel.com.


References:

Saad, K., Eltayeb, A. A., Mohamad, I. L., Al-Atram, A. A., Elserogy, Y., Bjørklund, G., ... & Nicholson, B. (2015). A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of digestive enzymes in children with autism spectrum disorders. Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience, 13(2), 188.

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